Gene Editing to Treat Disease: A success story in sickle cell disease

by Sophia Renauldfigures by Salvador Balkus Our understanding of the genetic material, or DNA, that makes up organisms has exploded over the last several decades. We have discovered that DNA is made up of multiple genes, and that different genes have different functions. We have also found that there is inherent variability in genes, meaning that the DNA of one organism is not identical to … Continue reading Gene Editing to Treat Disease: A success story in sickle cell disease

Our Cyborg Future: Brain-computer interfaces and their unique privacy challenges

by Vicki Xufigures by Corena Loeb Suppose someone wants to move their arm. How might they accomplish this task?  Every action starts with a thought — for instance, “move my arm” — that is essentially an electrical signal in the brain. The brain will send this message to the muscles in the arm, and the muscles in the arm will move. Now imagine that the … Continue reading Our Cyborg Future: Brain-computer interfaces and their unique privacy challenges

Science by the Pint presents: “Blood, drugs, and bugs!”

Come meet Professor Flaminia Catteruccia, and her lab, from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, and find out about their research on malaria, and the mosquitoes that transmit the pathogen that causes it!  Join us at The Seahag, 49 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138 on Tuesday, April 30th, between 6:30 and 8:00 PM. Drinks and snacks will be provided, and we … Continue reading Science by the Pint presents: “Blood, drugs, and bugs!”

Quantum Shorts Contest

The Harvard Quantum Initiative Blog is running a contest for students who are interested in quantum science! See below for more information and potentially win a trip to tour Harvard’s research facilities. HQI Blog: HQI Blog is a website run by graduate students in the Harvard Quantum Initiative (HQI). We are passionate about sharing our interest and knowledge in quantum science to the broader public … Continue reading Quantum Shorts Contest

A New Way to Beat the Heat: Scientists Develop an ‘Elastocaloric’ Cooling Device 

by Brittany Linnfigures by Swathy Karamchedu To escape the oppressive summer heat, many of us seek the cool retreat of air-conditioned shopping centers, movie theaters, and public buildings; however, traditional air-conditioning systems are not without environmental consequences. Climate change awareness has inspired numerous laws and regulations to phase out chemicals produced by air-conditioning systems that contribute to climate change. Liquid refrigerants, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) … Continue reading A New Way to Beat the Heat: Scientists Develop an ‘Elastocaloric’ Cooling Device 

Long COVID: The latest in a series of unexplained post-acute infectious syndromes?

by Ya’el Courtneyfigures by Gracyn Mose COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has killed over 1 million Americans from 2020 to 2024. This number is startling, especially considering that the harm of COVID-19 extends beyond loss of life and even beyond the symptoms of acute infection. While most people recover fully from SARS-CoV-2 infection within a week or two, in February 2024, 6.8% … Continue reading Long COVID: The latest in a series of unexplained post-acute infectious syndromes?

DNA Detectives: How scientists are using DNA from the environment to see the unseen

by Sanjana Kulkarnifigures by Swathy Karamchedu Forensic DNA testing has become crucial in criminal investigations and legal proceedings. DNA has linked people to crime scenes using hair or blood and exonerated wrongfully convicted individuals. This type of DNA is called environmental DNA (eDNA) because it is collected from the environment, rather than from a person. Scientists have also begun analyzing eDNA from non-human organisms. All … Continue reading DNA Detectives: How scientists are using DNA from the environment to see the unseen

Neuroinflammation, Itch, & Pain – A FREE EVENT – March 12 – Science by the Pint

Ever wondered about the connection between your brain, your need to scratch an itch, and the bacteria that grows on you and makes you sick? Harvard Immunologist Isaac Chiu and his lab are coming to Trident Booksellers and Café, this Tuesday, March 12th at 6:30 PM. Chat with them about how your brain talks to your immune system, responds to the bacteria in your body, … Continue reading Neuroinflammation, Itch, & Pain – A FREE EVENT – March 12 – Science by the Pint

A Sky Full of Data: Weather forecasting in the age of AI

by Rosella (Qian-Ze) Zhufigures by MacKenzie Mauger Have you ever meticulously planned a holiday around some pleasant weather, according to the weather forecasts, only to find yourself caught in relentless rain throughout your vacation? The challenge of predicting weather, with its inherent unpredictability, extends beyond mere inconvenience; it’s crucial for ensuring safety in scenarios like driving in heavy rain, avoiding areas prone to wildfires, or … Continue reading A Sky Full of Data: Weather forecasting in the age of AI

Access Denied: Opioid Medication-Assisted Treatment and the Urgent Call for Change in Opioid Recovery 

by Emma Dolenfigures by Allie Elchert Imagine a dystopia where a person with diabetes needs to drive a few hours every day to get their insulin at a special insulin clinic. Let’s pretend that they only need insulin once a day. They set their alarm for bright and early and get in the car to travel to the clinic before it closes for the day … Continue reading Access Denied: Opioid Medication-Assisted Treatment and the Urgent Call for Change in Opioid Recovery