Pint-Sized Science: Keeping It Clean: Engineering New Ways To Remove Toxic Contaminants From Storm Water

Interviewee: Dr. Jessica Ray, Assistant Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Washington Interviewer: Emily Kerr, PhD Candidate in Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University Pint-Sized Science · Keeping It Clean: Engineering New Ways To Remove Toxic Contaminants From Storm Water What happens when the rain dissolves potentially dangerous metals, organic chemicals, and other contaminants after a storm? In this episode of the Pint-Sized … Continue reading Pint-Sized Science: Keeping It Clean: Engineering New Ways To Remove Toxic Contaminants From Storm Water

October 28 – Deep Learning, Deep Implications

Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m., Wednesday, October 28th Join us on: Zoom (password: Seminar) or YouTube Live Speakers: JohnMark Taylor Graphics: Olivia Foster Rhoades You may not have heard of “artificial neural networks”, but if Facebook has ever automatically tagged you in a picture, you’ve definitely used one. Many experts once thought certain challenges in artificial intelligence wouldn’t be solved for decades: writing humanlike prose; recognizing people, places, and things; … Continue reading October 28 – Deep Learning, Deep Implications

It’s Worth a Shot: Preventing vaccine-preventable diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic

by Mahaa Ahmedfigures by Tal Scully The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many corners of the world to a standstill. While researchers and scientists race to develop and distribute a vaccine, many places are still subject to a host of restrictions on daily life designed to keep people safe. Unfortunately, this may actually lead to endangerment of children’s health in other critical ways. More than just … Continue reading It’s Worth a Shot: Preventing vaccine-preventable diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic

An Introduction to Ribosomes: Nature’s busiest molecular machines

by Francesca Tomasifigures by Jovana Andrejevic  Right now, the world is eagerly awaiting clinical trial data for two candidate COVID-19 vaccines known as mRNA vaccines. mRNA stands for “messenger RNA,” referring to the molecule that the vaccine delivers to our bodies. Once the vaccine enters our cells, the mRNA tells them exactly how to build a piece of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The vaccine itself cannot … Continue reading An Introduction to Ribosomes: Nature’s busiest molecular machines