047. BPAE CELLS - Kaleido Micrograph 16.9 mb

Cell-eidoscope

    Bovine Pulmonary Artery Epithelial (BPAE) cells have been featured several times in the gallery and on our Instagram; incase you missed them, check out Kaleidoskeleton, Plumotion, and Cytoskeleton Four Ways. In this stunning collage, BPAE cells and macrophages are artistically stitched in a kaleidoscopic array, their cytoskeletons and nuclei stained several different colors. The cytoskeleton is responsible for essential cell functions including cell … Continue reading Cell-eidoscope

Global Warming Concept Art

The Hottest Year on Record

The warm winter has been hard to miss. January temperatures were higher than average, and a little over a month ago most the Northeast was turning off the heat, opening windows, and wearing shorts in December. The strange weather hasn’t been confined to the past few months. In 2015 the world saw extreme floods along the Mississippi river, a heat wave in India that killed thousands … Continue reading The Hottest Year on Record

Figure 2: Immune surveillance in the CNS. Immune cells (pink) surveying the CSF present what they see to circulating T cells (purple). Lymphatics (green) provide a route for CSF and circulating immune cells to reach lymph nodes in the neck and return to the rest of the body.
In a healthy brain (left), T cells don’t see a problem and circulate back to the rest of the body. In a diseased brain (right), the T are alerted to infection and respond by infiltrating the parenchyma, which can cause immune-mediated damage. (Cells not to scale).

How a newly discovered body part changes our understanding of the brain (and the immune system)

by Marie Siwicki figures by Anna Maurer At this time of year, researchers, doctors, and recreational nerds alike turn to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for the list of the past year’s most important scientific breakthroughs [1]. 2015 saw many significant advances that gained flashy and well-deserved press. The world witnessed the creation of an Ebola vaccine, the first fly-by of … Continue reading How a newly discovered body part changes our understanding of the brain (and the immune system)

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Antibiotic Resistance: Old genes, new problems

by Alexandra Cantley figures by Joy Jiao and Shannon McArdel Over the last several years, antibiotic resistance has gripped the attention of the public. Recently, newspapers have alerted us to a “superbug” in China and detailed the struggles of Daniel Fells, a Giants team member who is facing surgery for a persistent MRSA infection [1,2]. Yet, a recent survey conducted by the World Health Organization … Continue reading Antibiotic Resistance: Old genes, new problems

Surface of Pluto

Pluto Who? Astronomers Find Evidence for “New” Ninth Planet

  It sounds like it belongs in a sci-fi B movie from the 1950s, but a growing body of evidence suggests that “Planet Nine” is the ninth planet in our solar system…if it actually exists.  Astronomers Konstantin Batygin and Michael Brown recently observed that the orbits of several small, rocky objects beyond Neptune were arranged in an unexpected manner.  In fact, their alignment is so … Continue reading Pluto Who? Astronomers Find Evidence for “New” Ninth Planet

094. CRYSTALS - ovoid colllage  14

Crystaleyes

One of our Instagram followers won a print of this beautiful image! Be sure to follow us on Instagram @SITN_Harvard for your chance to win some SciArt. This beautiful contribution from Don Pottle is best described by the legend himself: “A few years ago, I was asked by a maker  of  contact lenses to examine a few samples of used contact lenses.  There was a suspicion of … Continue reading Crystaleyes

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Can Obama’s Plan Cure Cancer?: Shooting the moon one patient at a time [Editorial]

by Steph Guerra During his last State of the Union address, President Obama announced a new national effort for ‘a moonshot’ to cure cancer. He wants “America to be the country to cure cancer once and for all.” Still reeling from the premature loss of his son to brain cancer, Joe Biden is set to spearhead this major push for federal cancer research funding. Cancer … Continue reading Can Obama’s Plan Cure Cancer?: Shooting the moon one patient at a time [Editorial]

Personalized-Nutrition

Illuminating the Link Between Weight Loss Success and Personal Genetics and Medical Histories

Know anyone who has made a complete commitment to a weight loss diet and not seen any results? Recent research suggests that generic diets that work for some may not work for everyone based on differences in individuals’ genetics and medical histories. In lieu of generic diets, some researchers propose a more personalized approach to nutrition, one that takes into account individuals’ unique characteristics to … Continue reading Illuminating the Link Between Weight Loss Success and Personal Genetics and Medical Histories

T cells (immune cells) attacking a cancer cell. This image is licensed by Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Oncolytic viruses- A one of a kind FDA approval

by Nishita Parnandi figures by Krissy Lyon One of the biggest challenges in treating cancer is to specifically target the cancerous site in a tissue without killing the surrounding normal cells. The use of oncolytic viruses is a new cancer treatment that is excellent at achieving just that. An oncolytic virus named ImlygicTM manufactured by Amgen recently received the stamp of approval from the FDA … Continue reading Oncolytic viruses- A one of a kind FDA approval

Mouse embryo

Gene editing emerges as a new therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Advances in gene editing technology have spurred considerable progress towards a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).  Although the disease is rare – affecting roughly 1 in 5,000 male births – its consequences are devastating: patients are confined to wheelchairs at an early age and often succumb to heart or respiratory failure in their twenties or thirties.  No treatments are currently available, but three separate … Continue reading Gene editing emerges as a new therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy