AquaBounty compares their fish (back) with a wild-caught fish of the same age.

Canadians bringing genetically modified salmon to their tables

AquaBounty, a Massachusetts-based company, began growing genetically modified (GM) salmon nearly three decades ago. However, it wasn’t until 2015 that the FDA approved the fish for human consumption. Health Canada made the same decision in 2016. While a current law prevents US sales until a labeling system is established, Canada has imported roughly 5 tons of the GM salmon since May 2016. Although the fish sell unlabeled, Canadians appear to be embracing the next frontier in aquaculture. Continue reading Canadians bringing genetically modified salmon to their tables

Human Lymphocyte

Turning the Immune System into an Equal Opportunity Cancer Killer

Results from a small clinical trial comprising 86 cancer patients have prompted scientists to rethink how different cancers are classified and treated. The drug being assessed was Keytruda, a recent addition to oncologists’ arsenal of cancer immunotherapy drugs.  Unlike traditional chemotherapies, which poison and kill cancer cells directly, cancer immunotherapy recruits the body’s own self-defense machinery to attack tumors.  Although our immune systems are very good … Continue reading Turning the Immune System into an Equal Opportunity Cancer Killer

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To Eat or Not to Eat? Miniature Livers Used in Safety Studies

Since food tasters have fallen out of fashion, scientists have had to devise new ways to check the safety of food and drugs that humans put in their mouths.  In the pharmaceutical industry for example, animals like mice and dogs are often used to predict if a drug candidate will be harmful to people.  If this seems strange to you, an unassuming Hershey bar should … Continue reading To Eat or Not to Eat? Miniature Livers Used in Safety Studies

Neurons

FDA Approves New Drug for Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide. In patients who suffer from MS, an abnormal immune response causes damage to a fatty substance called myelin. Like the coating around an electrical wire, myelin insulates nerve cells and facilitates neural communication. Symptoms of MS include muscle weakness, fatigue, and impaired speech. On March 28th 2017, the FDA approved Ocrevus, an … Continue reading FDA Approves New Drug for Multiple Sclerosis

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Make the FDA Great Again? Trump and the future of the drug approval process

Update: Since the writing of this article, Donald Trump has picked Scott Gottleib as FDA commissioner. -SITN editorial staff by Linda Honaker figures by Rebecca Clements Donald Trump will soon pick a new commissioner for the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). The choice will likely be someone who will try to make the administration’s drug approval requirements less rigorous in order to get drugs on the … Continue reading Make the FDA Great Again? Trump and the future of the drug approval process

Hand washing after handling raw meat or poultry or its packaging is a necessity because anything you touch afterwards could become contaminated. Wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food. Photo courtesy of USDA.



Say Goodbye to Antibacterial Soaps: Why the FDA is banning a household item

by Gabriel W. Rangel figures by Michael Gerhardt How many times per day do you wash your hands? Do you ever think about the type of soap you use? We all know handwashing with soap is an impactful way to maintain health by decreasing the risk of becoming infected with one germ or another. Therefore, using soap with antibacterial compounds added is a no-brainer, right? … Continue reading Say Goodbye to Antibacterial Soaps: Why the FDA is banning a household item

Photo of Vivitrol ad in Boston. Source- http://www.imgrum.net/media/1248854568843995389_356145

Prescription Drug Advertisement Goes on the Walls

by Li Zha Boston, MA has a very high concentration of biopharmaceutical companies and life science research. Residents in the area are bombarded by direct-to-consumer advertising of health care services and products even during their daily commute. On an average day, commuters can expect to see ads for clinical studies of depression or anorexia, as well as drugs that have just been approved by the … Continue reading Prescription Drug Advertisement Goes on the Walls