The Making of ChatGPT: From Data to Dialogue

by Shreya Johrifigures by Cynthia Moncada-Reid What if AI could design personalized workout plans, craft tailored travel itineraries, or even compose cover letters for job applications? With the advent of ChatGPT, it can. ChatGPT is an AI-powered chatbot that uses a cutting-edge machine learning architecture called GPT (Generative Pre-trained Transformer) to generate responses that closely resemble those of a human. Developed by OpenAI, ChatGPT is … Continue reading The Making of ChatGPT: From Data to Dialogue

How this Long Bacterium Beats the Diffusion Limit

by Mara Casebeer Most bacteria, like the common E. coli, are around a micron in length – less than a tenth of the width of a strand of human hair and invisible without a microscope. Recently, scientists discovered a bacterium, Candidatus (Ca.) Thiomargarita magnifica, that is almost 10,000 times longer than E. coli. Ca. T. magnifica cells were found attached to sunken leaves in the … Continue reading How this Long Bacterium Beats the Diffusion Limit

Competing Visions of Science Funding in Congress

by Nathan Druckerfigures by Daeun Jeong As the U.S. recovers from the pandemic and shores up its environmental defenses from a rapidly changing climate, federal money is being spent like never before. Simultaneously, the exceedingly competitive global economy is driving lawmakers to thrust the American economy into the 21st century. One result of this fervor is a potentially vast increase in federal funding for science … Continue reading Competing Visions of Science Funding in Congress

Edward Bouchet: Trailblazer, teacher, and public servant

Tamina Kienka is a third year student in the MD-PhD program at Harvard University. Jovana Andrejevic is a fifth-year Applied Physics Ph.D. student in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Cover image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay. This biography is part of our “Picture a Scientist” initiative. To learn more about the amazing men and women who paved the way for … Continue reading Edward Bouchet: Trailblazer, teacher, and public servant

Edward Bouchet: Trailblazer, teacher, and public servant

by Tamina Kienka In the fall of 1852, Edward Bouchet was born to a freed slave living in New Haven, Connecticut. His father worked as a laborer and his mother as a housewife. They were both active in their local abolitionist movement and encouraged Edward Bouchet and his three older sisters to gain an education.  Given the still segregated public school system, Bouchet attended the … Continue reading Edward Bouchet: Trailblazer, teacher, and public servant

John Dabiri: The oceanic adventures of a bioengineer

Manasvi Verma, 1st year PhD student in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program at Harvard Medical School. Jovana Andrejevic is a fifth-year Applied Physics Ph.D. student in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. cover Image by Vlad Vasnetsov from Pixabay. This biography is part of our “Picture a Scientist” initiative. To learn more about the amazing men and women who paved … Continue reading John Dabiri: The oceanic adventures of a bioengineer