As good as it gets? Peer review and its discontents

In February, the journal Nature and its sister publications announced a new policy for their peer review process (the evaluation of submitted articles by experts in the field). The journal normally operates on the basis of single-blind peer review–anonymous reviewers see the authors’ names and affiliations. The new policy will allow authors the option to remain anonymous to the experts reviewing their work. Will this … Continue reading As good as it gets? Peer review and its discontents

Thrills and Spills: The Keystone XL Pipeline

Turning on the tap for a clean glass of water is a luxury many Americans take for granted. Though TransCanada Corporation promises minimal spillage and environmental impact through improved safety features in its plans to install a 1169-mile-long, 36-inch-wide pipe through the grasslands of Canada and the United States, risking this natural resource is one of the many considerations President Obama examined before vetoing the … Continue reading Thrills and Spills: The Keystone XL Pipeline

Call for the pass of chemical safety reform

Image Credit: Kristen Seim Jane eats organic foods, avoids plastic containers and switched to plant-based shampoo and cosmetics.  “You have no idea how clean my home is, but I still don’t feel protected,” Jane told me. Like many other expectant mothers, Jane is stressed about protecting her baby’s health. We all have reasons to be worried about man-made chemicals in our environment, even if we … Continue reading Call for the pass of chemical safety reform

Worth the trip: psychedelics as an emerging tool for psychotherapy

As your eyes close, a kaleidoscopic vision of pattern, color, and sense of deep meaning engulfs your entire field of experience. Thirty minutes ago you were given a controlled dose of a highly potent, and highly illegal, hallucinogenic compound—all in the name of science. Months from now, you will say that this was one of the most profound experiences of your life [5]. You have … Continue reading Worth the trip: psychedelics as an emerging tool for psychotherapy

Patenting our genes, killing our startups.

Interest in entrepreneurship and start-up culture seem to be at an all-time high, especially when it comes to the tech industry. But why do so many of the best young graduates choose to work on the next sexting app rather than on an app-based algorithm for clinical patient support? It’s a question that demands an answer, and soon. A key problem seems to be that … Continue reading Patenting our genes, killing our startups.

Risks of cannabis use in light of legalization surge

Should cannabis be legalized in the United States, and if so, under what conditions? Current research on medical consequences of cannabis use suggest that heavy use of cannabis can have longlasting effects on lung, cardiovascular and mental health, but casual use seems of little harm compared to cigarettes and alcohol. Brain scans of regular marijuana users suggest that people who are not addicted (yet) already … Continue reading Risks of cannabis use in light of legalization surge

ScienceEd

Sparking Scientific Curiosity: (R)evolutions in the way we teach and learn

Presented by Kevin Harlen, Greg Kestin, Katie Dagon, and Ben Morris Science education is a hot topic many of us have heard discussed widely in the media, by politicians and in America’s school systems. This talk will shed light on the different aspects of science education, why they are important and how they will impact us today and in the future. Our presentation will open … Continue reading Sparking Scientific Curiosity: (R)evolutions in the way we teach and learn