Figure 2: Immune surveillance in the CNS. Immune cells (pink) surveying the CSF present what they see to circulating T cells (purple). Lymphatics (green) provide a route for CSF and circulating immune cells to reach lymph nodes in the neck and return to the rest of the body.
In a healthy brain (left), T cells don’t see a problem and circulate back to the rest of the body. In a diseased brain (right), the T are alerted to infection and respond by infiltrating the parenchyma, which can cause immune-mediated damage. (Cells not to scale).

How a newly discovered body part changes our understanding of the brain (and the immune system)

by Marie Siwicki figures by Anna Maurer At this time of year, researchers, doctors, and recreational nerds alike turn to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for the list of the past year’s most important scientific breakthroughs [1]. 2015 saw many significant advances that gained flashy and well-deserved press. The world witnessed the creation of an Ebola vaccine, the first fly-by of … Continue reading How a newly discovered body part changes our understanding of the brain (and the immune system)