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Next Seminar – May 17 – One in a Million: The Battle Against Antibiotic Resistance

May 17, 7 pm Pfizer Hall (directions) and livestream Antibiotic resistance is an important public health problem. In this lecture, we will learn about what antibiotic resistance is and how it arises. Ultimately, antibiotic resistance occurs through a process of natural selection and evolution. In complex organisms such as humans, evolution takes place in thousands to millions of years. However, bacteria grow very quickly, have … Continue reading Next Seminar – May 17 – One in a Million: The Battle Against Antibiotic Resistance

Prespective Runway

Want to become a better runner? Get some running buddies

The Internet abounds with running guides for beginners. Buy these shoes! Download this app! Do these dynamic warm up stretches! And while all of this advice works for getting you off the couch, the most effective trick for sticking to a running routine may be to surround yourself with other runners. Sinan Aral and Christos Nicolaides at MIT’s Sloan School of Management wanted to explore … Continue reading Want to become a better runner? Get some running buddies

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To Eat or Not to Eat? Miniature Livers Used in Safety Studies

Since food tasters have fallen out of fashion, scientists have had to devise new ways to check the safety of food and drugs that humans put in their mouths.  In the pharmaceutical industry for example, animals like mice and dogs are often used to predict if a drug candidate will be harmful to people.  If this seems strange to you, an unassuming Hershey bar should … Continue reading To Eat or Not to Eat? Miniature Livers Used in Safety Studies

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Shining A Light in the Brain: Optogenetics as a “guiding light” for deep brain stimulation

by Trevor Haynes In the late 18th century a particularly resourceful experimenter, Giovanni Aldini, saw scientific opportunity in the increasingly prevalent public executions being performed across Europe at the time. Using the corpse of a recently deceased prisoner, Aldini electrically stimulated the prisoner’s exposed brain causing his eyes to open and his face to contort and twitch, thus putting his uncle’s theory of bioelectricity to … Continue reading Shining A Light in the Brain: Optogenetics as a “guiding light” for deep brain stimulation

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Oak Wood Cross Section

Cross section of oak wood, showing every reason that made an oak tall and strong. The large pores are vessels that are responsible for transporting (more accurately, pumping/pushing) water from the root system to the tip of the tree. The densely packed purple dots are stained lignin in the cells walls. During early wood development, once lignin is deposited in the cell wall, these cells … Continue reading Oak Wood Cross Section

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Holly Wood Tangential Section

Tangential section of wood of Chinese holly. This is how it looks like when you do a cut that’s perpendicular to the radius of the stem. The vertical lines are vessels transporting water from roots to leaves, while the circles are clustered ray cells that function to transport fluids and nutrients radially and laterally (perpendicular to the long axis) within a woody stem. Contributed by … Continue reading Holly Wood Tangential Section

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Why Scientists Need to be Better Communicators

by Marina Watanabe I once attended a lecture by a famed physicist, and left convinced that physics was the biggest sham in the universe (or multiverse, if you believe him). At one point, the professor answered an audience member’s question by “clarifying” that if you were on the inside (of what?!) looking out (to where?!), time was time. However, if you were on the outside … Continue reading Why Scientists Need to be Better Communicators