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Psychosis, Dreams, and Memory in AI

by Henry Wilkin figures by Rebecca Clements The original dream of research in artificial intelligence was to understand what it is that makes us who we are. Because of this, artificial intelligence has always been close to cognitive science, even if the two have been somewhat far apart in practice. Functional AIs have tended to do best at quickly finding ‘good-enough’ approaches to problems that … Continue reading Psychosis, Dreams, and Memory in AI

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Building a Better Human: How scientists plan to merge man and machine to transcend human limitations

by Julia Nguyen figures by Alexandra Was What would you give for a brain chip that seamlessly translates any language into your native tongue? Or a retinal implant that lets you see in the dark? Or an implant that lets you record every single memory and experience in your life and replay it at any moment? This is all science fiction, but it may not … Continue reading Building a Better Human: How scientists plan to merge man and machine to transcend human limitations

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Self-driving Cars: The technology, risks and possibilities

by Tim Menke figures by Neal Akatsuka Imagine getting into your car in the morning, sipping your coffee and sitting back to relax while your car drives you to work. Then you remember to call a friend who you have not spoken to in a while, or you have a look at the amazing photos from your latest vacation. It is, of course, not a … Continue reading Self-driving Cars: The technology, risks and possibilities

Figure 1: Machine learning algorithms take behavior data from the parts of our lives that we make available on the internet to give us personalized suggestions.

Recommended For You: How machine learning helps you choose what to consume next

by Jennifer Wei figures by Jeep Veerasak Srisuknimit Ever wonder how music-streaming services such as Spotify and Pandora find songs that you like? Or how Facebook and Google find stories that are interesting to you? Many technology companies use machine learning algorithms to give personalized product suggestions; these algorithms can be found everywhere on the internet. One such algorithm may have even led you to … Continue reading Recommended For You: How machine learning helps you choose what to consume next

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Moon and Stars

If you look closely at this zebrafish embryo, you will notice bright spots that look like stars covering the entire body. The nuclei of each cell in this embryo has been labeled with a fluorescent protein so when you look at the nuclei under a microscope, they are resplendent. By labeling each individual nuclei, we can visualize changes occurring in each cell throughout development of … Continue reading Moon and Stars

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Cross-section of the Developing Zebrafish Heart

There are a multitude of signals that elegantly orchestrate the proper development of the heart. In this image of a 3-day-old zebrafish heart, the signal that is localized to the developing atrio-ventricular valve and smooth muscle is labeled in green using green fluorescent protein (GFP). This particular signal is important for the formation of the cardiac valves, which will allow blood to pass from the … Continue reading Cross-section of the Developing Zebrafish Heart

AquaBounty compares their fish (back) with a wild-caught fish of the same age.

Canadians bringing genetically modified salmon to their tables

AquaBounty, a Massachusetts-based company, began growing genetically modified (GM) salmon nearly three decades ago. However, it wasn’t until 2015 that the FDA approved the fish for human consumption. Health Canada made the same decision in 2016. While a current law prevents US sales until a labeling system is established, Canada has imported roughly 5 tons of the GM salmon since May 2016. Although the fish sell unlabeled, Canadians appear to be embracing the next frontier in aquaculture. Continue reading Canadians bringing genetically modified salmon to their tables